PRESS QUOTES AND ARTICLES

Upcoming shows

  • Saturday, October 28th 2017 Music in the Mountains
    Phoenix, AZ

  • Saturday, November 4th 2017 Herberger Theater
    Phoenix, AZ

  • Thursday, November 9th 2017 NERFA
    Stamford, CT

  • Sunday, November 26th 2017 Boyce Thompson Arboretum
    Superior, AZ

  • Saturday, February 24th 2018 Music in the Mountains
    Phoenix, AZ

View Full Schedule

ROOTSTIME (Belgium)

Dani Heyvaert | March, 2017

(translated from Dutch) 
I do not know how familiar Annie Moscow is with you, readers, but for me she was, until a few weeks ago a completely blank slate. PASSING TRAINS, Annie’s 5th release, won’t allow her to fly under the radar anymore with an exceptional release by a strong, experienced and honest woman.

After 26 years of marriage, when Annie’s husband realized his identity was in fact female, what did Annie do? She struggled and then went about creating art, revealing more about herself in these songs, while finding her voice in this compelling release.

PASSING TRAINS will touch you deeply, thanks to the production of the late John Jennings, the producer and bandmate for Mary Chapin Carpenter and countless others, this record perhaps being one of his last released.

A penetrating and honest record, Annie artfully turned her feelings and experiences on PASSING TRAINS into healing, yet beautiful songs, with themes that we all sometimes struggle with.

Annie Moscow catches the world in her eyes as she looks through the window of Passing Trains, her recent release. Using a Folk music backdrop of guitar and piano, Annie tells her tales on the album, snapping pictures of the humanity traveling by with snippet of phrases that flesh out her characters. An NYC artist is drawn by her words as Annie Moscow sets the stage of He Paints Cats in Washington Square Park, giving the homeless painter a life that could be envied in its freedom by her description of his survival techniques. Passing Trains hears the rattle of rails amid rolling piano and haunting melodies in the title track as it watches its characters as moving targets while Back Again smiles at memories and gets in line with a worldwide community seeking What Everybody Else Wants.

Annie Moscow paints a desert scene with peaceful tranquility in the reverie of Sometimes I Think of You as she sticks a bouncing beat underneath the fading love story in Teflon Man, spills details in the sparkling flow of notes from It’s Just Water, and watches others pair up as she sits alone at a table for one in Someone to Walk with Me. Annie Moscow strums stories as she captures universal topics shared in both the small towns and big cities glimpsed from Passing Trains as years fall like the unrealized dreams in Someday as she borrows a familiar character from The Kinks Ray Davies to share a cherry cola with Lola.

THE ALTERNATIVE ROOT MAGAZINE

Danny McCloskey | February, 2017

Annie Moscow catches the world in her eyes as she looks through the window of Passing Trains, her recent release. Using a Folk music backdrop of guitar and piano, Annie tells her tales on the album, snapping pictures of the humanity traveling by with snippet of phrases that flesh out her characters. An NYC artist is drawn by her words as Annie Moscow sets the stage of He Paints Cats in Washington Square Park, giving the homeless painter a life that could be envied in its freedom by her description of his survival techniques. Passing Trains hears the rattle of rails amid rolling piano and haunting melodies in the title track as it watches its characters as moving targets while Back Again smiles at memories and gets in line with a worldwide community seeking What Everybody Else Wants.

Annie Moscow paints a desert scene with peaceful tranquility in the reverie of Sometimes I Think of You as she sticks a bouncing beat underneath the fading love story in Teflon Man, spills details in the sparkling flow of notes from It’s Just Water, and watches others pair up as she sits alone at a table for one in Someone to Walk with Me. Annie Moscow strums stories as she captures universal topics shared in both the small towns and big cities glimpsed from Passing Trains as years fall like the unrealized dreams in Someday as she borrows a familiar character from The Kinks Ray Davies to share a cherry cola with Lola.

Herberger Theater Center

Judy Rollings | September 23, 2016

Annie Moscow has a “voice” beyond her lovely singing voice that captivated me from the first of the many shows she has done for Lunch Time Theater.  A true poet, her commentary on life, culture and society are deeply insightful, and filled with humor and wisdom.  Put all of that on state delivered by an amazing classically trained pianist who sings her heart out, and you have Annie Moscow who unflinchingly and honestly tells all!

by Dan Buckley, Formerly Arts and Entertainment Reporter with THE TUCSON CITIZEN | June 17, 2014

My friend Annie Moscow after her one woman show, “Sea of Change,” at the Herberger Theatre in Phoenix. Annie has always been one of my favorite singer songwriters in the state because she has an ability to write lyrics that everyone can relate to and music you just want to hear again and again. Her current show is the most personal piece I’ve seen her do to date, and not a particularly common theme. Annie was married to a man for almost 30 years who, a few years back, decided to have a sex change operation. While we all applaud those with the courage to be who they really are, we forget sometimes that there is some serious collateral damage. In this show Annie tells her story, personally and honestly, with a lot of humor, and a huge thread of redemtion for her. She talks honestly about the pain and sheer numbness she went through, and about how she too is coming out the other side. On top of that we hear a clutch of new songs that are really powerful and wonderful. The’y’re songs you’d love whether you heard them in this context or just on their own. They’re songs I guarantee every person in that fairly full house could relate to. I highly recommend seeing this show, and checking out Annie Moscow wherever and whenever you can. Congrats, Annie. You made me laugh. You made me understand something I never conceived of before. And you made me proud to know this great spirit among us. You kicked ass, Annie. Be proud.

ARIZONA LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE

by Kenneth LaFave  |  February 11, 2011
“Whatever else she is, Annie Moscow may be the most important Arizona musician you’ve never heard of…”

Perfect Moment Project

(blog) by Robin, Tempe |  January 26, 2012

“Annie Moscow’s message was universal.  She was kind of a female Harry Chapin, entertaining us with songs, stories, a wink of an eye.”

ACOUSTIC AMERICANA MUSIC GUIDE

by Larry Wines  | February 07, 2011

Uber-talented Annie Moscow is subject of magazine feature..

PHOENIX CULTURAL EVENTS EXAMINER

by Ru Hernandez | September 09, 2009
Free Spirit Dreaming Dreaming in Suburbia
Philosophical Musings is a delightful, thought-provoking mix of storytelling, songs and audience interaction from an ex-hippie.

Perspectives in the form of friends who would make quirky characters for an outlandish, surrealistic novel. Except that these folks are so weird they must be real\\Poet/pianist Annie Moscow’s entertaining one-woman theater revue is fitting for these money-tight times.  We live in an era of homes in suburbia lost to foreclosures, imminent job layoffs at all socioeconomic levels and cherished career dreams dashed by harsh economic realities.

For just over an hour the audience at Moscow’s one-act musical interspersed with her poignant philosophical musings were able to forget their own financial problems – or at least laugh at them while listening to this seasoned musician’s songs and bittersweet lessons.

And what do you get for your hard-earned cash?  You get a mix of Annie Moscow-penned songs and imaginative lyrics from her two CDs and live shows.  You get insightful story-telling and get to meet Annie’s life experiences and perspectives in the form of friends who would make quirky characters for an outlandish, surrealistic novel.  Except that these folks are so weird they must be real.

Characters like Drew, the high schoolmate who looked so hot but turned out to be gay.  Like her woman friend who calls herself the “Orange Juice Fairy.”  Or listen to the whimsical lyrics welcoming you to suburbia, “Where the beds are warm, and the floors are clean and the dogs are fat and the lawns are green.”

Philosophical Musings is a delightful, thought-provoking mix of storytelling, songs and audience interaction from an ex-hippie.

Go visit Annie’s world.  where mid-life crises bites down hard, lost opportunities compete with dreams gone wrong, and we ponder the personal prices we pay for four walls – and are able to laugh all the while.”

ARIZONA REPUBLIC

by Kerry Lengl  | September 09, 2009

“Storytelling comes naturally to Annie Moscow, both in the songs she writes and in the chatter that comes between them in concert…”

PASADENA WEEKLY

– TRAX by Bliss  |  March 12, 2009

“Moscow’s lyrics skillfully empathize with lost characters (the title track) and capture the intimate losses of time.”

by Lee Zimmerman
“Hers is a singular voice, both in it’s soaring resonance and in its poignant perspective, a rarity in a musical environment that champions teen queens and bitter babes… It’s fair to say Wolves at My Door is a howling success.”

COLLECTED SOUNDS WOMEN IN MUSIC

by Anna Maria Stjarnell

“Annie Moscow plays the piano beautifully and has a great talent for songwriting. Her music is thoughtful, emotionally complex and mature. Her range is dazzling. The more I listen to this music the more I discover. This is a keeper.”

DRAMA BEAT (cover story)

by Lou Hunt | September 13, 2002

New artists, like poet/pianist Annie Moscow, are quietly connecting with their audience by sharing a vulnerability that often startles us with its familiarity to our own thoughts, fears and frustrations. It’s as if our everyday lives are being given a new perspective when we see and hear our “own” stories woven into rhythm, color and rhyme.”